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Want an “open” Android phone? Want to download thousands of applications? TMO News has a rumor you’ll love:


TmoNews is putting in our vote of confidence on a presale of the Android phone on September 16th, 2008.

This information, coming from a trusted source, prices the Android phone, also known as the G1 (Codename or real name, we’re not sure) at $399.

T-mobile customers can pick up the phone for $150. This is where it gets interesting, we’re not seeing any prices for new activations during the presale, so this could mean that only current T-mobile customers can pick up the G1 during the presale. Other customers interested in the G1 may have to wait until beginning/mid October before a national public launch.

Many users have seen the recent video circulating the next claiming to be the HTC Dream (AKA G1). The G1 will be released in black, white, and brown. Being 3G enabled, the HTC manufactured G1 will unfortunately require its own data plan from T-mobile, which we expect to be more expensive then current data plans. Interestingly enough (maybe not so much knowing Google) users will be required to have a Google Gmail account for the phone to work.

So far expected specs include 3G, a long and wide touch screen, and a slide out Qwerty keypad, and no mention of UMA or Wi-Fi.

No mention of Wi-Fi? What kind of phone is that?

The NY Times says it won’t show until October or later.

Moco News says, starting this fall, T-Mobile USA roll out an Apps Store, not unlike Apple’s. It will be available to download a variety of applications, for a variety of phones available from the carrier, not just one model (like the iPhone).

C/Net says the first T-Mobile AWS (3G) phones will be the Samsung SGH-T639, Samsung SGH-T819, Nokia 6263, and Nokia 3555, largely voice-centric phones. More sophisticated smartphones using the data capability of the AWS band are expected later.

In July, Google announced that the latest SDK would be released first to the 50 winners of its Android Developer Challenge, a $10 million contest that the company is using to find the best and most innovative Android applications.

But the news that Google was reserving its latest and best development tools for a handpicked group, as well as failing to announce a firm date for the SDK’s general release, hasn’t gone down well with many developers, says Infoworld.

Related Dailywireless stories include; OpenMoko Arrives, Apps Store: Red Hot, T-Mobile Plans Ap Store, Android: No Unification, Las Vegas Gets T-Mobile AWS, New LiMo Handsets, License to Print Money, Location Apps: Here. Now. and Open Warfare at OsCon.

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