Students Get Free iPhones



Abilene Christian University, in Albilene, Texas, will hand out Apple’s iPhone 3G to two-thirds of this year’s entering class of 950 freshmen.

Students will be expected to use the devices to brainstorm ideas and get virtual handouts and podcasts during class while instructors will use them for such tasks as monitoring attendance.

“This is a new platform for learning, in the same way a laptop or a desktop was a new platform,” says William Rankin, co-director of mobile learning research at the school.

Other schools across the country, from Michigan to Maryland and Texas to North Carolina, are using advanced wireless devices for learning, reports Business Week. According to a survey of 700 teens published in April by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 71% of respondents already own cell phones, while only 59% own computers. Cell-phone ownership among college kids is even higher.

They’re portable and cost much less then laptops.

Perhaps libraries will soon check out mobile WiMAX devices, like Netbooks, UMPCs, MIDs, Kindles or Android Phones — much like CD and movie checkouts. Becoming creators not just consumers.

Not Portland’s Multnomah County Library. They don’t believe in free WiFi and will kick you off internet terminals after 60 minutes.

Portland’s central library used to call Portland’s free, but ill-fated MetroFi service, “their” system. Now the Multnomah County’s Library system is beginning to install hotspots of their own — some ten years behind their patrons.

Google just posted details on Android Market. Like Apple’s iPhone App Store, Android Market will run on Android phones like the HTC Dream. Google will host the application store, which will let users find, download and install applications.

Google has wrapped up judging on its very first Android Developer Challenge, with some twenty dev shops (and individuals) finding themselves relatively rich and famous with a variety of compelling applications.

How about listening to e-books and news on the bus with a free text-to-speech application?

Time for a change.

Posted by Sam Churchill on .