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NIKE has announced an Android-compatible Nike+ Running App. The Nike+ Running App for Android connects seamlessly to nikeplus.com, which allows runners to track, share and compare their runs from anywhere, anytime.

The Android app – like the Apple app before it – lets runners check key run stats, see their in-progress GPS maps, change songs or get audio feedback without missing a stride.

A “Next Moves” feature on the home screen allows runners to easily flip through suggested challenges: for example, to run their fastest 5k or go their farthest distance. A dynamic goal progress bar helps runners stay motivated and tracking on goals they’ve set up through their nikeplus.com profile.

The app can share your data through Facebook or Twitter. Runners can choose from a wide variety of terrains and emotions, as well as tag which shoe they ran in to track shoe total mileage. And for runners recording climate conditions, the app automatically knows the weather based on GPS location.

The Nike+ Running App for Android is available free on Google Play.

Initially launched for Running in 2006, NIKE+ has expanded into a multi-sport ecosystem that includes Nike+ Basketball, Nike+ Training and the recently launched Nike+ Kinect Training. Their NIKE+ FuelBand is a wrist-based device designed to track everyday activity.

Nike is adding Bluetooth 4.0 to their devices as are other fitness companies like Wahoo (above).

Low energy Bluetooth 4.0 hub devices (such as phones, tablets or watches), are being labeled Bluetooth Smart Ready meaning they will allow phones to continue to connect with the billions of older Bluetooth devices in the market today as well as the new Bluetooth Smart devices, using Low Energy technology.

Bluetooth v4.0 enables two different wireless radios. The radio in a Bluetooth Smart Ready device is referred to as dual mode, meaning it supports both classic Bluetooth wireless connections as well as new Bluetooth low energy connections. Smartphones that support Bluetooth 4 include the iPhone 4S, the latest Android smartphones from Samsung, HTC and Motorola, as well the latest Apple laptops and (soon) Windows 8 computers.

The radio in a Bluetooth Smart device is referred to as single mode, meaning it supports only new Bluetooth low energy connections. They run on tiny button batteries for a year or more.

Wahoo’s new Speed/Cadence Sensor uses Bluetooth 4.0. It’s designed to track your speed and cadence information while on a bike. The final retail production units are expected to cost $59. They communicate to your nearby Bluetooth 4.0 phone using the low energy component.

There are currently three apps (plus the Odometer) that can utilize the new Blue SC sensor. The list today includes: Strava, Cyclemeter and the Wahoo Fitness App (plus the Wahoo Odometer).

Most smartphones will likely include Bluetooth 4.0 (Bluetooth Smart Ready) soon and dozens of smart devices that connect with them are expected to enter the market shortly.

Related Dailywireless articles include; Polar Ships Bluetooth 4 Heart Monitor, HTC One S: Android 4 & Bluetooth Low Energy and FCC Okays Medical Body Networks

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