Lawsuits: The Next Big Thing

Apple filed an enforcement complaint against HTC a month ago, and asked for an immediate ban of 29 new HTC devices. Apple this week lost its bid to have HTC devices banned in the U.S. while the International Trade Commission (ITC) considered Cupertino’s patent complaint. The ITC agreed to hear Apple’s case, but declined to ban the import and U.S. sale of HTC devices while its investigation proceeds.

Meanwhile, Apple and Samsung are waging legal war in around 10 countries, accusing each other of patent violations. Apple sued Samsung last year, the world’s largest cell phone manufacturer, of “slavishly” copying the iPhone and iPad.

Yesterday, Judge Lucy Koh denied Samsung’s motion to stay the preliminary injunction against the Galaxy Tab 10.1 and the Nexus Smartphone. Samsung now has to respect the injunction.

The Galaxy Nexus is Google’s lead Android device (soon to be upgraded to Jelly Bean), so Koh’s ruling is the biggest patent setback for Android to date.

Samsung’s resellers in the United States are major wireless carriers and they may still have significant quantities of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in their warehouses. But at some point they’ll run out unless Samsung gets the injunction stayed (or overturned, but that will take much longer. Samsung can still win a stay, but it now depends on the Courts of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC). Until the CAFC decides on Samsung’s request for a stay, the injunction is in effect.

Samsung now appears to have the support of Google in its legal battle with Apple.

Chinese IP awareness, sown by West, is coming back to haunt Apple, reports Reuters. A Chinese company is suing Apple, claiming that the latter’s Snow Leopard operating system has the same Chinese name as its registered trademark. The company had developed a series of computer-related products under the trademark and accused Apple of making profits from its reputation in China.

Apple will likely launch OS X Mountain Lion on July 25 if it repeats what it did last year when it announced Lion a day after its quarterly earnings call.

Posted by Sam Churchill on .

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