Google Maps on Car Infotainment Systems

Google just announced that Hyundai and Kia automobiles, will integrate Google Maps and Places into its telematics systems. Both Hyundai’s Blue Link and Kia’s second-generation UVO eServices will soon give drivers access to Google Maps and Google Places.

In addition to Hyundai, other automakers are integrating Google Maps into their information systems:

  • Tesla: A 17-inch, high-resolution touch screen display brings Google Maps to life in the Tesla Model S. Drivers can see topographic satellite images with overlaid roads and real-time traffic updates from Google Maps.
  • Audi: Audi connect brings Google local search, satellite and Street View imagery directly to drivers and passengers, providing real-time, real-life images of the world around you – from California’s Highway 1 to Chicago’s “Magnificent Mile.” Combined with voice search, you can safely explore and discover local destinations.
  • Daimler: The Mercedes-Benz “Digital DriveStyle App” gives you access to Google local search, as well as Zagat ratings to make it easy to find anything from a Michelin-rated restaurant to your favorite fast food joint.

Automotive Telematics systems include; Ford Sync, which utilizes your mobile phone for the connection and provides a voice input/output, Chrysler Uconnect Web, which provides a wi-fi “hot-spot” in Chrysler, Dodge, or Jeep vehicles, and the new General Motors MyLink infotainment system, which will first be available in the 2014 Chevrolet Impala.

The Mercedes iDrive system controls climate, audio, navigation and communications. A new Cockpit Command System (CIC) was introduced in September 2008 to deal with some of the earlier iDrive issues. BMW’s LTE-capable Car Hotspot uses a SIM card for connecting to the BMW Car Hotspot. Placing an NFC-enabled mobile phone on top of BMW’s LTE Hotspot enables a WiFi connection to be established automatically.

Verizon is joining forces with some of the biggest auto manufacturers to “accelerate development of the 4G LTE ecosystem” in connected cars. Called the 4G Venture Forum for Connected Cars, the new group includes BMW, Honda, Hyundai, Kia, and Toyota. In June, telematics provider Hughes was acquired by Verizon for $612 million, marking the biggest acquisition in the history of the telematics industry.

Sprint will use Airbiquity’s Choreo system, which lets auto manufacturers manage the technology after an owner leaves the dealership, so if new technology becomes available, the in-car systems can be updated. Airbiquity integrates smartphone applications into the vehicle using Choreo.

NG Connect, conceived and founded by Alcatel-Lucent, promotes LTE connectivity for vehicles.

Cisco and NXP Semiconductors announced their intention to join the smart car bandwagon with a dual investment in Cohda Wireless, an Australian developer of hardware and software solutions for connected vehicles that allow cars to wirelessly communicate with one another to prevent collisions.

More than fifteen leading automotive OEMs will meet at the Consumer Telematics Show, one day before the International Consumer Electronics Show next week. Telematics Update reviews the top stories of 2013.

According to IMS Research, Wi-Fi in automotive applications will increase eight fold over the next seven years in North America and Western Europe. The market for infotainment systems alone is set to grow 7.3% year on year to $35.89 billion in 2013.

Related DailyWireless stories on transit connectivity include; Verizon Forms Connected Car Venture, Automotive Telematics Goes 4G, Ford Lowers SYNC Costs, Google’s Driverless Car Explained, World Congress on Talking Cars, Connected Car Conference, Google + General Motors?, Ford Mobilizes Smartphone Apps, Hands-free Vehicular Calling, Tracking Tools, In-Vehicle Infotainment: Death Race, CradlePoint: Mobile WiFi/WiMAX Hot Spots, Mercedes myCOMAND, BMW iDrive Gets Makeover, Handheld Intelligent Transportation, Chrysler Offers Internet Access, Chrysler Rolls Out U-connect, Ford Sync.

Posted by Sam Churchill on .

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