Backhaul Solutions from Tarana Wireless & DragonWave

Tarana Wireless, a start-up based in Santa Clara, California, is showcasing its new “AbsoluteAir” wireless backhaul solution for both non–line of sight (NLoS) and line–of–sight (LoS) operation.

Tarana features a unique Concentrating Multipoint (CMP) architecture that delivers a full 75 Mbps backhaul capacity to each small cell and enables the number of links to scale as data demand grows, without degrading per–link capacity.

The AbsoluteAir product line consists of Concentrator Nodes (CNs), End Nodes (ENs), and an Element Management System (EMS). Each EN connects directly via Ethernet to a small cell providing it with a full 75 Mbps dedicated backhaul capacity. Each link utilizes the same 10 MHz channel while maintaining full link capacity. The company is supporting licensed and lightly licensed TDD bands from 2.5–3.7 GHz,

Tarana’s AbsoluteAir antenna has a 100° aperture that dynamically aligns during both setup and ongoing operation. The company says this enables deployment of individual nodes in just 15 minutes. It leverages advanced signal processing algorithms to optimize link performance.

The Concentrator Nodes aggregates links for up to four End Nodes providing 300 Mbps capacity in a single 10 MHz channel.

The company says it is able to deliver the full data rate on every link even in dense small cell deployments at a range of 2–4km in NLoS. Each link utilizes the same 10 MHz channel while maintaining full link capacity. The company is supporting licensed and lightly licensed TDD bands from 2.5–3.7 GHz,

DragonWave is also showing off a set of new backhaul products. DragonWave’s Avenue Link Lite is a new design for a radio that uses bands under 6GHz, with a form factor of only 7.5 in square including antenna. It supports both licensed and unlicensed spectrum and is ideally suited for non-line-of-sight (NLOS) scenarios.

Sub-6GHz backhaul in some bands can suffer interference from other networks, including some Wi-Fi systems, but it’s well suited to dense urban areas, because sub-6GHz radios are good at bouncing around buildings and other obstacles to reach a destination that may be around a corner.

Posted by Sam Churchill on .

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