iBeacons Come to Grocery Stores

Bluetooth LE ibeacons will be installed at the entry of over 200 Safeway and Giant Eagle grocery stores in Seattle, San Francisco and Cleveland, and more after that.

iBeacons are small round devices slightly larger than a quarter that contain a Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy radio. The devices send out short-range messages to smartphones like Appleā€™s iPhone and newer Android devices. Apps like inMarket will trigger a variety of different behaviors.

The primary goal is to reach shoppers who they know are walking in or near a store. Apple added support for iBeacons with its iOS 7 software release last year and has its own iBeacons running in many of its own retail stores.

iBeacons and other similar Bluetooth LE beacons works by using Bluetooth low energy Proximity sensing to transmit a Universally unique identifier. It can trigger an action on the device such as a Check-in on social media. They are hyper-local, pinpointing location to within a few feet, work indoors and consume very little power.

Qualcomm today announced that its Gimbal proximity beacons are now commercially available in two models, and accurate down to one foot and work indoors and outdoors.

Series 10 beacons have a battery life of many months or up to a year; Series 20 beacons have a battery life of 1-3 years. Series 10 beacons are available for as little as $5 each and Series 20 beacons are available for as little as $10 each.

inMarket CEO and co-founder Todd DiPaola says their case studies involving partners like Coca-Cola, Procter & Gamble and others that show an immense difference in effectiveness between offerings that are made to consumers right in the store vs. at home or elsewhere.

In-app mobile adspend will reach $16.9 billion by 2018, up from $3.5 billion last year, a new report from Juniper Research has found. According to the report, growth will be driven by several key factors including improved targeting capabilities, as well as a trend for more effective interactive rich media ads to be deployed in preference to traditional static display advertising.

Posted by Sam Churchill on .

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