SoftBank Sells T-Mobile Bid on Charlie Rose

The CEO of Sprint owner SoftBank said he’ll start a “massive price war” if his company can purchase T-Mobile US.

But if Masayoshi Son, the “Bill Gates of Japan,” does make a bid for T-Mobile, it could face opposition from an FCC that blocked AT&T’s bid to purchase T-Mobile in 2011.

“We’d like to make a deal, but there are steps and details that we have to work out,” SoftBank founder and CEO Masayoshi Son said on the Charlie Rose show this week.

Japan–a country roughly the size of Montana–hopes to get its 4G LTE network to 70 percent population coverage by March 2015, notes Fierce Wireless. In the U.S., three of the four nationwide carriers have already reached that threshold.

Consumers who want to use an iPhone on Softbank’s network have to pay at least $65.34. For that, consumers get a 7 GB data bucket that is throttled beyond 7 GB to 2G speeds and free in-network calling between 1:00 am and 9:00 pm. If Softbank customers want to make calls to their friends on another carrier’s network or between 9:00 pm and 1:00 am, they have to pay $0.20 for every 30 seconds, says analyst Roger Entner.

On the other hand, Free Mobile in France has a $28 per monthly plan – without a contract – that includes unlimited voice, texting and 20 GB of 3G/LTE data. Free Mobile reached an 8% market share in its first year. Its medium-term goal (2014/2015) is a 15% market share and its long-term goal is 25%.

The fate of Dish’s 55 Mhz of spectrum is the elephant in the room.

One of the big four carriers could be a host/partner, but why should they allow themselves to be undercut by Dish — with access to 14 million rooftops and over the top video streaming. Google or Facebook could offer some real competition to this foursome. With a 600 MHz hammer.

Posted by Sam Churchill on .

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