Mimosa Networks: Outdoor Multi-User MIMO

Mimosa Networks, a pioneer in gigabit wireless technology, has announced a new suite of outdoor 802.11ac 4×4 access points and client devices, to create “the world’s highest capacity low-cost outdoor solution and the first with MU-MIMO”. It’s targeting Wireless ISPs and enterprises, but their products won’t be available until Summer/Fall 2015.

Currently most 802.11ac access points use Single User MIMO where every transmission is sent to a single destination only. Other users have to wait their turn. Multi-User MIMO lets multiple clients use a single channel. MU-MIMO applies an extended version of space-division multiple access (SDMA) to allow multiple transmitters to send separate signals and multiple receivers to receive separate signals simultaneously in the same band.

With advanced RF isolation and satellite timing services (GPS and GLONASS), Mimosa collocates multiple radios using the same channel on a single tower while the entire network synchronizes to avoid self-interference.

Additionally, rather than relying on a traditional controller, the access platform takes advantage of Mimosa Cloud Services to seamlessly manage subscriber capacities and network-wide spectrum and interference mitigation.

“The next great advancement in the wireless industry will come from progress in spectrum re-use technology. To that extent, MU-MIMO is a powerful technology that enables simultaneous downlink transmission to multiple clients, fixed or mobile, drastically increasing network speed and capacity as well as spectrum efficiency,” said Jaime Fink, CPO of Mimosa. “Our products deliver immense capacity in an incredibly low power and lightweight package. This, coupled with MU-MIMO and innovative collocation techniques, allows our products to thrive in any environment or deployment scenario and in areas with extreme spectrum congestion.”

The A5 access points are available in 3 different options: A5-90 (90º Sector), High Gain A5-360 (360º Omni with 18 dBi gain) and Low Gain A5-360 (360º Omni with 14 dBi gain). The C5 Client device is small dish, available in 20 dBi gain. The B5c Backhaul leverages 802.11ac, 4×4:4 MIMO and is said to be capable of 1 Gbps throughput.

All four of the products will debut in wireless ISP networks in Summer/Fall 2015 and are currently available for pre-order on the Mimosa website. List Prices are: $1099 for A5-90, $999 for A5 360 18 dBi, $949 for A5 360 14 dBi, $99 for C5.

Mimosa Networks says the new FCC 5 GHz Rules Will Limit Broadband Delivery. New rules prohibit the use of the entire band for transmission, and instead require radios to avoid the edges of the band, severely limiting the amount of spectrum available for use (the FCC is trying to avoid interference with the 5.9 GHz band planned for transporation infrastructure and automobiles).

In addition, concerns about interference of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (at 5600-5650 MHz) prompted the FCC to disallow the TDWR band. Attempting to balance the needs of all constituencies (pdf), the new FCC regulation adds 100 MHz of new outdoor spectrum (5150-5250 MHz), allowing 53 dBm EIRP for point-to-point links. At the same time, however, it disqualifies Part 15.247 and imposes the stringent emissions requirement of 15.407 ostensibly in order to avoid interference with radar.

Mimosa – along with WISPA and a number of other wireless equipment vendors – believes that the FCC’s current limits will hurt the usefulness of high gain point-to-point antennas. Mimosa wants FCC to open 10.0-10.5 GHz band for backhaul.

Multi-User MIMO promises to handle large crowds better then Wave 1 802.11ac products since the different users can use different streams at the same time. Public Hotspots serving large crowds will benefit with MU-MIMO but enterprise and carrier-grade gear could be a year away, say industry observers.

The FCC has increased Wi-Fi power in the lower 5 GHz band at 5.15-5.25 GHz, making Comcast and mobile phone operators happy since they can make use of 802.11ac networks, both indoors and out, even utilizing all four channels for up to 1 Gbps wireless networking.

The FCC’s 5 GHz U-NII Report & Order allowed higher power in the 5.150 – 5.250 GHz band.

These FCC U-NII technical modifications are separate from another proposal currently under study by the FCC and NTIA that would add another 195 MHz of spectrum under U-NII rules in two new bands, U-NII 2B (5.350 – 5.470 GHz) and U-NII 4 (5.850 – 5.925 GHz).

Commercial entities, including cable operators, cellular operators, and independent companies seem destined to blanket every dense urban area in the country with high-power 5 GHz service – “free” if you’re already a subscriber on their subscription network
.

WifiForward released a new economic study (pdf) that finds unlicensed spectrum generated $222 billion in value to the U.S. economy in 2013 and contributed $6.7 billion to U.S. GDP. The new study provides three general conclusions about the impact of unlicensed spectrum, detailing the ways in which it makes wireline broadband and cellular networks more effective, serves as a platform for innovative services and new technologies, and expands consumer choice.

Additional Dailywireless spectrum news include; Comcast Buys Cloud Control WiFi Company, Gowex Declares Bankruptcy, Ruckus Announces Cloud-Based WiFi Services, Cloud4Wi: Cloud-Managed, Geo-enabled Hotspots, Ad-Sponsored WiFi Initiatives from Gowex & Facebook,
FCC Moves to Add 195 MHz to Unlicensed 5 GHz band, Samsung: Here Comes 60 GHz, 802.11ad, Cellular on Unlicensed Bands, FCC Opens 3.5 GHz for Shared Access, FCC Commissioner: Higher Power in Lower 5 GHz, FCC Authorizes High Power at 5.15 – 5.25 GHz

Samsung: Here Comes 60 GHz, 802.11ad

Samsung Electronics today announced a 60GHz (802.11ad) Wi-Fi technology that enables data transmission speeds of up to 4.6Gbps, a five-fold increase from 866Mbps, using the 5 GHz band. The 60 GHz Wi-Fi technology will enable a 1 gigabyte movie to be transferred between devices in less than three seconds while allowing uncompressed high-definition videos to be streamed from mobile devices. Samsung likely to include WiGig as a differentiator in its Galaxy and
Note smartphones by the end of 2015, say industry observers.

Samsung says its 802.11ad technology eliminates co-channel interference, no matter how many devices are accessing network. Samsung also enhanced the overall signal quality by developing what they say is the world’s first micro beam-forming control technology that optimizes the communications module in 1/3,000 second increments.

The Wireless Gigabit Alliance (WiGig) was a trade association that developed and promoted the adoption of multi-gigabit speed wireless standards over the unlicensed 60 GHz frequency band. The alliance was subsumed by the Wi-Fi Alliance in March 2013.

Samsung notes there are challenges in commercializing 60 GHz Wi-Fi because millimeter waves that travel by line-of-sight and have weak propagation characteristics that will be easily blocked by walls.

Chipsets supporting 60GHz 802.11ad are coming from a variety of sources including Qualcomm, Marvel and Broadcom as well as small, fabless semiconductor firms like Nitero. Qualcom’s Snapdragon 810, due next year, includes WiGig. Qualcomm acquired Wilocity in July 2014, and Nitero has announced its mobile WiGig solution.

Samsung said it plans to put its 802.11ad technology in a variety of devices, including audio visual and medical devices, as well as telecommunications equipment.

Eventually, the Wi-Fi Alliance expects chipsets to support all three bands, enabling both compatibility and new uses.

Samsung isn’t the first to promote 60 GHz for consumers. Dell introduced the Latitude 6430u laptop at the 2013 CES which included both 2.4 and 5 GHz connections, as well as a new 60 GHz connections.

Here’s a review of evolving WiFi standards:

  • IEEE 802.11n: Increased the maximum raw data rate from 54 Mbit/s to 600 Mbit/s by using as many as four spatial streams with a double width channel (40 MHz). MIMO architecture and wider channels improved speeds on 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz channels.
  • IEEE 802.11ac: Provides high throughput in the 5 GHz band. It uses 80 MHz and 160 MHz channel bandwidths (vs. 40 MHz maximum in 802.11n) and supports up to 8 spatial streams (vs. 4 in 802.11n)
  • IEEE 802.11ad: Now with the WiGig specs folded in, provides high throughput in the 5 GHz band and 60 GHz bands. The 60 GHz band is stopped by walls, so range will be shorter, but the spectrum is wider, supporting nearly 7 Gbps throughput.

The unlicensed 60 GHz band varies slightly around the world. The standard divides the unlicensed 60 GHz band into four 2.16 GHz wide channels. Data rates of up to 7 Gbits/s are possible using OFDM with different modulation schemes. A single-channel version for low-power operation is available and can deliver a speed up to 4.6 Gbits/s.

ABI Research estimates over 1.5 billion chipsets with 802.11ad will ship in 2018. Smartphones will account for nearly half of all 802.11ad-enabled products in 2018, though with less than half the volume in smartphones compared to 802.11ac, says the research firm.

The IEEE 802.11ac and 802.11ad standards may also use Multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO), where simultaneous streams are transmitted to different users on the same channels.

Related Dailywireless articles include; WiGig: 60 GHz WiFi Rolls Out, WiGig to Demo 4K Wireless at Intel Forum, WiGig Folded Into Wi-Fi at 60 GHz, Marvel 802.11ac: Now with 4×4 Beamforming, Fast Transistion to 802.11ac Predicts ABI, Broadcom 802.11ac for Phones, Quantenna: 802.11ac Chipset,

FCC: Better Rural Broadband & 5G Spectrum

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler wants to see to the program that provides subsidies for Internet service in public schools and libraries known as E-Rate address broadband access by schools and libraries in rural areas, reports Roll Call.

In prepared remarks for an education technology event in Washington on Monday, Wheeler said that “75 percent of rural public schools today are unable to achieve the high-speed connectivity goals we have set.” He pointed to lack of access to fiber networks and the cost of paying for it when it’s available.

Wheeler says the FCC has set a clear target of $1 billion per year for Wi-Fi based internal networks for schools and libraries. “As a result, we will begin to see results in the next funding year, with expanded support for Wi-Fi to tens of millions of students and thousands of libraries”.

Wheeler’s speech comes after the FCC made changes to the E-Rate program this summer. Wheeler’s earlier plan to shake up the program was only partly successful — his FCC colleagues agreed to make more money available for Wi-Fi, as Wheeler proposed in June, but only if the money isn’t needed for basic Internet connections.

In other news, in announcing its agenda for its Oct. 17 open meeting, the FCC said it will vote on a Notice of Inquiry to “explore innovative developments in the use of spectrum above 24 GHz for mobile wireless services, and how the Commission can facilitate the development and deployment of those technologies.”

In a blog post, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler wrote that the inquiry is aimed at broadening the FCC’s “understanding of the state of the art in technological developments that will enable the use of millimeter wave spectrum above 24 GHz for mobile wireless services.”

“Historically, mobile wireless services have been targeted at bands below 3 GHz due to technological and practical limitations. However, there have been significant developments in antenna and processing technologies that may allow the use of higher frequencies – in this case those above 24 GHz – for mobile applications”, wrote the Chairman.

5G or 5th generation wireless systems is expected to be the next major phase of mobile telecommunications standards and use frequencies above 5-6 GHz (where more spectrum is available. 5G does not describe any particular specification in any official document published by any telecommunication standardization body, and is expected to deliver over 10 Gbps, compared to 1 Gbps in 4G. It is expected to be first utilized for backhaul to cell sites.

Currently, Ubiquiti’s AirFiber has set the standard in 24 GHz at $3K for 700 Mbps while SAF, Trango, and others have announced similar products at $5000 or less.

Regarding “net neutrality”, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler says financial arrangements between broadband providers and content sites might be OK so long as the agreement is “commercially reasonable” and companies disclose publicly how they prioritize Internet traffic.

Not everyone agrees. Netflix and much of the public accuses the FCC of handing the Internet over to the highest bidders. There is no deadline for the FCC to pass a new rule, and deliberations at the agency could continue into next year.

Proponents of government-owned broadband networks claim they introduce competition into the market, while critics say they are an inappropriate use of tax dollars and an example of government improperly competing with the private sector.

The 3G4G Blog, compiled by Zahid Ghadialy, is perhaps the most comprehensive site covering 5G technology news.

Beyond LTE: Rysavy Explains Broadband Explosion

A new white paper, Beyond LTE: Enabling the Mobile Broadband Explosion, and its accompanying slide presentation (pdf), was created in collaboration with Rysavy Research and member companies at 4g Americas.

It’s a handy summary of mobile broadband networks, past, present and future. Mobile broadband is becoming one of the most successful and fastest-growing industries of all time.

According to Rysavy, computing itself is transitioning from a PC era to a mobile era. Many users will never interact with a PC.

The wireless industry is addressing exploding data demand through a combination of technologies.

Newer releases of LTE will feature more efficient technology, denser deployments, small cells, HetNets, self-configuration, self-optimization, use of unlicensed spectrum with Wi-Fi, and the LTE operation in unlicensed bands.

Initial LTE deployments have been faster than any wireless technology previously deployed.

LTE Release 12, with completion expected by the end of 2014, will feature improved small cells/HetNets, LTE multi-antenna/site technologies (including Active Antenna Systems), Dual Connectivity, enhancements for interworking with Wi-Fi, support for emergency and public safety, device-to-device communication (also referred to as proximity services), addition of Web Real Time Communication (WebRTC) and more flexible carrier aggregation.

Mobile broadband has become the leading edge in innovation and development for computing, networking, and application development.

The explosive success of mobile broadband mandates ongoing capacity increases. The industry has responded by using more efficient technologies, deploying more cell sites, off-loading onto Wi-Fi, and working with government on spectrum-sharing.

In the U.S., a number of initiatives could improve industry prospects—AWS-3, television incentive auctions for 600 MHz spectrum, the 3.5 GHz small-cell band, more unlicensed spectrum at 5GHz.

Rysavy concludes that obtaining more spectrum remains a critical priority and that LTE/LTE-Advanced will be the most widely chosen technology platform for the remainder of this decade.

Cellular on Unlicensed Bands

Researchers working on next-gen cellular technologies are exploring cellular services on unlicensed 3.5 GHz, 5GHz and even 60 GHz, reports EE Times. Companies like DoCoMo, Huawei, Alcatel-Lucent, Nokia and Qualcomm are looking at using unlicensed spectrum for subscription LTE services because LTE is said to increase capacity and reliability over WiFi technolgoy.

Japanese cellco NTT DOCOMO has successfully demonstrated LTE over the ‘unlicensed’ 5GHz band. The test uses the so-called LAA (Licensed-Assisted Access) on the 5 GHz band.

“Currently, we are aiming to finish the joint experiment by fiscal 2015. The next step will be to develop a technology that will enable LAA and WLAN to efficiently coexist in the same spectrum. We hope LAA will be standardized with the Release 13 LTE which should come out in fiscal 2016,” DoCoMo said.

According to Huawei, operators must think outside-the-box by innovating their business models, and providing innovative solutions, such as LTE video for consumers & enterprises as well as using unlicensed bands for LTE.

Qualcomm is also an advocate of LTE on 5 GHz. With LTE broadcast, a single video channel can multicast to hundreds of users, particularly useful for stadiums or major national events.

Qualcomm’s proposal, dubbed Authorized Shared Access (ASA), is similar to the Licensed Shared Access (LSA) that is being considered among European carriers for the 5 GHz and 3.5 GHz bands.

The FCC proposed a 3.5 GHz sharing arrangement includes three tiers:

  1. Incumbent Access, which would include authorized federal users and grandfathered fixed satellite service licensees
  2. Protected Access, which would include “critical use facilities, such as hospitals, utilities, government facilities, and public-safety entities
  3. General Authorized Access, which would include all other users, including the general public.

The 3.5GHz Interest Group has reached a consensus on a uniform network scheme on Bands 42 & 43 to ensure effective collaboration and sharing. The group suggests that spectrum allocation be no finer than 40MHz per block, so that its roughly 400MHz of bandwidth is utilized effectively.

SoftBank constructed nine 3.5GHz base stations within the Ginza shopping area, making for an average spacing of less than 300 meters.

The network used 80MHz of 3.5GHz bandwidth, and supported an average download speed of 550Mbps (770Mbps peak), enabled by technologies the likes of 4*4 Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output systems (MIMO), carrier aggregation (CA), coordinated multipoint (CoMP) transmission and cloud baseband.

UK Broadband switched on its first TD-LTE system in London back in 2012 using the 3.5GHz band with gear from Huawei. It utilizes over 120MHz of spectrum in Bands 42 and 43, sufficient for six 20MHz channels that can be aggregated for LTE-A when the time comes.

UKB operates a wholesale model and works with partners like Relish to offer commercial services in the businesses, consumer and public sector. UK Broadband is a wholly owned subsidiary of PCCW Limited, the holding company of HKT, Hong Kong’s premier telecommunications provider.

One of the big questions, of course, is whether cellular operators will soon charge for the air that was previously free.

Related Dailywireless articles include; UK Broadband: TD-LTE at 3.5GHz, FCC Opens 3.5 GHz for Shared Access, Qualcomm: Chips for MU-MIMO, Small Cells, Home Gateway, Battle for 3 Dot 5, London Served 3.5GHz Fixed Wireless – with Relish, FCC Boss Wheeler Pushes for 3.5 GHz Spectrum Sharing, FCC Paves Way for 3.5GHz Band Nationwide, FCC Dishes Dirt, Talks Up 3.5 GHz, FCC Limits Dish on LTE Terrestrial Spectrum, Dish: On the Move, Dish and Sprint Battle over PCS band Extension, FCC Approves 2.3 GHz for AT&T, AT&T Likely to Get 2.3 GHz, Sprint’s Dish Compromise, MetroPCS Merges with T-Mobile USA, T-Mobile Gets AWS Spectrum from Breakup, FirstNet: The Asymetrical Threat, Spectrum War: Unlicensed, Shared and Auctioned, White Spaces: Nationwide by Mid January, FCC: TV Auction in 2014, Genachowski Lobbies for Unlicensed White Spaces, Universal Service Reform Passed

Commercial Drone Integration by 2015 Unlikely

The FAA will likely miss their 2015 deadline to let companies fly drones, reports The Verge.

Last week the Department of Transportation found that the FAA is “significantly behind schedule” and that there are still “significant technological, regulatory, and management barriers” preventing the FAA from integrating drones into the national airspace.

Those barriers include: failing to create standards that would allow drones to detect and avoid other aircraft, as well as ensure reliable connections with their controllers; not yet determining regulatory requirements — such as certifications and air traffic procedures — for managing drones; and not ensuring that all issues with drones are reported and tracked.

The FAA says that it’s on track to issue a rule proposal for allowing flights of small drones this year.

Last summer, the FAA issued restricted category type certificates for commercial use in Alaska of the Insitu ScanEagle, a fixed-wing UAV, developed on the Columbia River Gorge and the Puma. On June 10th, 2014, the FAA approved the first commercial UAV use over land of the AeroVironment Puma.

Congress has instructed the FAA to integrate commercial drones into public airspace, where they will fly in coordination with conventional aircraft.

The FAA selected the University of Alaska’s proposal which contained Hawaii and Oregon UAV test range locations. In total, 58 companies and 13 test ranges are part of the Pan-Pacific UAS Test Range.

YouTube Preview Image

Rising Tide Innovations, a UAS software developer, says Oregon’s test ranges will spawn jobs at tech centers and manufacturing operations.

Oregon Unmanned Systems Business Enterprise, a nonprofit now called SOAR, is designed to establish Oregon as a leader in the civilian uses of unmanned aircraft. The organization is launching with a two-year $882,000 state grant from the Oregon Business Development Department and the Oregon Innovation Council.

Initial grant recipients are:

  • Paradigm ISR of Bend for development of a system to collect and analyze pest management data for agricultural crops, $60,000.
  • NW UAV of McMinnville, in partnership with the VT Group of Tigard, for completion of a new, certifiable propulsion system for flight vehicles, $75,000.
  • Fordyce Design and Manufacturing of Gaston for a standardized servo system for flight vehicles, $14,000.
  • Insitu’s Advanced Programs Engineering Group of Hood River for development of flight navigation and communication systems to integrate manned and unmanned aircraft for missions such as firefighting and search and rescue, $75,000; and
  • Cloud Cap Technologies to integrate Sagetech’s next generation transponder for development of a new-generation transponder and autopilot for improved flight safety at test ranges and eventually in the general airspace, $103,000.

SoarOregon considered about 40 proposals from area companies in the first round of funding this April.

YouTube Preview Image

Google’s Project Loon uses radio-equipped balloons to deliver internet access from 12 miles above the earth. It currently uses WiFi bands at 2.4 and 5.8 GHz which are available for anyone to use.

Google also plans to test unlicensed “TV white space” radios, using 512-602 MHz and 620-698 MHz. At 4 W per 6 MHz channel, they are expected to cover a radius of 5 miles from its Mountain View, California campus.

The Solara 50 solar-power UAV from Titan Aerospace carries 70 lb payloads to 20 kilometers (12 miles), and acts as an cellular base station providing an 18-mile coverage radius. DARPA’s Mobile Hotspots program aims to build mobile 70/80 GHz backhaul for UAVs, connecting at 1 Gb/s.

We Are The Pioneers from SkywardIO on Vimeo.

Jonathan Evans, CEO of Portland-based SkyWard.io, explains how the emerging aerial robotics network will operate.

YouTube Preview Image

Aireon will use the Iridium NEXT for their ADS-B service, starting in 2015. Globalstar also plans a space-based air traffic management system that will compliment ground-based ADS-B. It’s a true over-the-horizon air traffic surveillance system capable of delivering Air Traffic Control (ATC) automation.

YouTube Preview Image

OpenVX provides mobile developers with an industry standard API to deliver embedded computer vision and computational imaging chipsets that can keep UAVs on track.

Orbit Logic does Mission Planning for satellites and UAVs.

FAA-approved test sites, type certification for commercial use over certain restricted areas, ADS-B automation, flight-plan and mission planning software, embedded processing chips, FLIR, hyperspectral and Lidar cameras, and broadband wireless connections are coming together.

Applications in forest and terrain surveys, agricultural monitoring, public safety, maritime and transportation industries can save money and lives.

Tech Town Portland from Uncage the Soul Productions on Vimeo.

Domestic commercial drones could be a $13 billion industry by 2017, creating 70,240 jobs, according to the AUVSI. They estimate Oregon’s share at $81 million with about 400 high-skilled, high-paying jobs.

Here’s my Proposal for a Columbia River Drone Network.